Super Smart Study Strategies for Finals Week

Hi, friends! Finals week is coming up quickly. Most students will shiver at that thought, but never fear! Here are some tips to help you have a successful finals week.

Smart Study Strategies for Finals Week | Here are ways to prepare yourself for finals!

Find out the practical details of each exam.

Will it be cumulative? If not, which chapters will it cover? What format will it be in (multiple choice, essay, short answer…)? How much time will you have? This will give you an idea of what you need to study. There is a good chance this information will be on the class syllabus, but if it isn’t, ask your professor.
Also, make sure you know exactly when and where the exam will take place, since some exams might not take place in the classroom at the normal class time…

Finals week is coming up! Here are some smart study strategies to help you succeed 🙂 Click To Tweet
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5 Powerful Active Recall Strategies

Hi, friends. Today I’m publishing a guest post by Kay from Smart Student Secrets. I love this post because it’s full of great information and actionable tips on how to incorporate this information into your study strategies. I hope you enjoy it!

I used to struggle with tests before I learned to use active recall for studying.

The test would be sitting in front of me. I would be scrunching up my face thinking, “I know this… I think I know this… What was that answer again…” I would come up with answers but I never had any confidence because it was always a struggle. This is a problem that I now understand.

I was familiar with the material but I didn’t know it well. This is the problem that active recall solves.

You shouldn’t have to struggle to remember everything on your tests. You’re not a bad test taker. You just need to learn a few new strategies. These strategies can increase your test scores and turn you into a top-notch test-taker.

It gets better than that too. You’ll also save a ton of time learning for class.

In active recall, you need to practice remembering “it” to remember “it.” “It” is whatever you need to study.

What Is Active Recall?

Active Recall is a principle of learning. Here is the simple way to understand it:

You need to practice remembering “it” to remember “it.” “It” is whatever you need to study.

The most common active recall tool students use is a set of flashcards. When you read one side of a flashcard and then remember what’s on the other side, you’re using active recall. If you flip the flashcard over without remember then you’re not using active recall…

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How to Seamlessly Transfer Schools + My Transfer Experience

Hi, friends! You may not know this, but I’m a transfer student. I decided to write a post about my transfer experience and tips for prospective transfer students because I haven’t seen many posts about transferring. However, I did find 2 helpful articles for those who are interested (they are linked at the end of this post!). Transferring schools can be both exciting and nerve racking. The application process and getting settled into a new school is work, but if you approach it in a timely and organized manner, you will be just fine. Here is my personal transfer experience and some tips for those who are considering transferring schools.

Are you a transfer student or interested in transferring? Here are a few ways to make the process easier.

My Transfer Experience

I graduated high school at only 17 years old. Because I was so young, my parents didn’t want me to go away just yet. So, I decided to attend a community college (I already had some credits there thanks to dual enrollment!) and earn an AA to then continue to a state university. I was there for a year, and it was a great year. I am thankful for my experience at that school because it allowed me to start gaining experience in STEM at such a young age. I did well in my classes and it was comfortable…

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Why You Should Talk To Your Professor

Hi, friends! There are a million articles that tell you to talk to your professor when you get stuck. This is great advice, but unfortunately, few students actually follow this advice because they think professors are too “intimidating” and “serious.” I’m sure there are some professors who are intimidating, serious, and don’t care about their students, but the truth is that they are the minority.

Professors are great resources for students. Here's why you should talk to your professor.

Most professors actually want to see their students succeed. In fact, it’s their job to help you. One of my professors said, “Unless there’s an extenuating circumstance, I will never turn away a student who comes to office hours asking for help.” I had another professor say that he only had a handful of students come in to office hours throughout the semester (how ironic is it that the students who don’t come to office hours are the ones who gripe about their grades at the end?).

Your professor will help you understand confusing concepts.

It’s a professor’s job to explain the concept, but it’s your job to make sure you understand it. If you don’t understand a concept the first time around, don’t just sit there staring at your book. Asking your professor for help is much easier, quicker, and less stressful than trying to figure it out on your own…

Professors are great resources for students. Here's why you should talk to your professor. Click To Tweet
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Common College Misconceptions

Hi, friends! I was recently thinking that people go into college with distorted ideas of what it’s really like. Sometimes, they’re right, but sometimes they’re not. This post is meant to help you get a realistic idea of what college is like.

Common College Misconceptions | Sometimes, college isn't all people say it is. Here are some common college misconceptions.

Sometimes, college isn't all people say it is. Here are common college misconceptions. Click To Tweet

Your high school study habits will be enough

College is much more demanding than high school. You’ll realize this during your freshman year. It’s okay if your freshman year is a period of transition between high school and college. In this period you’ll learn to stretch yourself to meet the higher demands of college life. You will have to spend more time studying, learn how to manage your time, and build organizational skills at a whole new level. It takes time, so don’t be too discouraged if your grades dip at first. Once you get the hang of it, you should be doing well again.

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